Monday, July 02, 2007

Schadenfreude


Above: Banksy mural in London - (ripped from this source)

Schadenfreude could somewhat describe the state we are in with respect to the recent thrashings of the media over the identity of the splasher (who goes around systematically defacing the streets of New York City with unsightly splashes of paint over famous works by graffiti artists ostensibly because some of the more famous of these are starting to see some commercial success and gallery representations). Of course it can best be dismissed by saying that this substitute’s one form of vandalism for another, but a look at blogs like this tell us that some of these works are indeed well thought out - and I actually like some of them and study them on my way to work. Anyways, the whole movement got a further boost after the New York Times published a manifesto produced by the splasher on their website last week and some parts of it does make for interesting reading. Most of it are rants (like most manifesto’s it sizzles out after the initial premise)…
The funny thing might be that all of this might be a very elegant ruse by a new street artist to gain fame and subsequent gallery representation or, on the other hand, this could be the handiwork of a person who could genuinely be at odds with the current ‘red-hot-hedge-fund-based-art-market’ system and all the ills that the messages conveyed by the same.
With statements like “The boredom excreted by museums increasingly resembles the stench of the church” emblazoned as a catch phrase for the splashers actions, it does seem like the person has thought some of the process and actions through. City life is interesting and this is one more twist to the excitement.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Petz this is a German word which means 'Somebody who likes to damage things'
Sindhu.

Sunil said...

It also means pleasure taken from someone else’s misfortune.

It derives from Schaden (damage, harm) and Freude (joy); Schaden derives from the Middle High German schade, from the Old High German scado, and freude comes from the Middle High German vreude, from the Old High German frewida, from frō, (happy). (From wikipedia)

The connotation used here on the blog refers to the English usage more than the German usage which has a completely negative one. In the English sense it is more of a feeling than an actual physical actuality...

Rodrigo said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Tree said...

Sigh...I do love manifestos. All that passion and fire...
I think the splashers make some good points and I am frustrated by a lot of what I see in the art world, but to put glass in the glue in order to hurt people...horrible and inexcusable.
It will be interesting to see what comes of all of this.

gnaneesh said...

Can You Please tell me where You got those pictures of the painting having quote "Raja Ravi Varma (1848 - 1906), 'Portrait of a North Indian Lady', Oil on canvas, Sri Jayachamarajendra Art Gallery, Mysore"

My mail ID is gnaneesh@gmail.com