Friday, July 13, 2007

Poetry

Thomas Moran (1837-1926), ‘Moonlight, Icebergs in Mid Atlantic’, 1910, Oil on unlined canvas, 20 X 30 inches, Private collection.


In late April of 1890 on a trip to Venice, Moran's ship was en route to Antwerp when it passed an iceberg. He made a rapid pencil drawing and as he could not sketch quickly enough, he described verbally: 'water pouring over the sides of the berg, deep blue water and rollers capped with foam'. This was painted about twenty years after his sighting of the icebergs in the middle of the Atlantic.

Thomas Moran was an extremely famous landscape painter and this one was one of his lesser known 'sea' paintings... This painting is a riot of clouds, waves, floating ice mountains with the ice resembling rocks and vice versa. By confusing the distinctions of a foamy head of a wave with the sharp edges of ice, Moran artfully engages us in deception of visual detail that can be so reminiscent of an open raging sea.

4 comments:

Tree said...

I can definitely see the influence of Turner in this painting.

Sunil said...

Good point...

zs said...

This is a Moran painting I didn't know...thanks for posting it. It's really amazing and I'm fascinated by the 20 year time span between the painting and the sighting. It's as if this painting is as much about memory and subconscious as it a literal representation of that moment in the Atlantic.

Sunil said...

Zoe,
Thank you for coming by and commenting. I am in awe of your pictures and a lot of them inspire me to paint (looks like we share looking at people in the same strata). I am honored.
Please do keep coming.